latest automotive news, best new and used cars, find a new car f3b82_93107041990212-610x406 QOTD: Which Cars Failed to Meet the OEM’s Hype? Honda   Back in December, Matthew Guy penned an interesting QOTD post soliciting your picks for the most outrageous new car introduction. In the case of the new-for-1993 Jeep Grand Cherokee, Bob Lutz drove Chrysler’s new (and important) SUV up a set of stairs at Cobo Hall and through a plate glass window. History revealed the hype to be justified: the Grand Cherokee became an instant success, finding its way into suburban middle-class driveways across America.

Sometimes, though, the new product doesn’t live up to the manufacturer’s hype before introduction. Let’s talk disappointment.

latest automotive news, best new and used cars, find a new car f3b82_CRX-550x384 QOTD: Which Cars Failed to Meet the OEM’s Hype? Honda

Hold on, that’s not the disappointing bit — it’s the thing that created the subsequent disappointment years later. As your heart rate settles back down, let me explain. Honda wanted to bring a new sporty car to the market for 2011.

latest automotive news, best new and used cars, find a new car f3b82_CR-Z QOTD: Which Cars Failed to Meet the OEM’s Hype? Honda   The idea behind said new vehicle was very promising, and very simple. Honda wanted to resurrect the ever-desirable CR-X (1984-1991) into a brand new two-seat hatchback. The key characteristics from the original CR-X were on order for this new vehicle. Honda’s CEO himself said the new CR-Z was to be sporty, incredibly efficient, and inexpensive.

latest automotive news, best new and used cars, find a new car 7901b_1524655618_50ac086d5d_b-1-610x427 QOTD: Which Cars Failed to Meet the OEM’s Hype? Honda   Displayed all the way back in 2007 at the Tokyo Motor Show, Honda was keen to explain that CR-Z stood for “Compact Renaissance Zero.” The Renaissance part was capturing the spirit of the original CR-X. The concept looked promising.

latest automotive news, best new and used cars, find a new car 7901b_2012-Honda-CR-Z-Hybrid-Front-Right QOTD: Which Cars Failed to Meet the OEM’s Hype? Honda   What was delivered for the 2011 model year was not. A 1.5-liter inline-four engine and an electric motor powered the (hybrid only) CR-Z, making a combined 122 horsepower. Though it was small, the hatchback weighed 2,670 pounds with a manual transmission. For reference, the second generation CR-X Si weighed 2,103 pounds, and had a 1.6-liter VTEC engine producing 108 horsepower.

latest automotive news, best new and used cars, find a new car 7901b_cr-z6 QOTD: Which Cars Failed to Meet the OEM’s Hype? Honda   Paired with a six-speed manual transmission or a CVT, the CR-Z qualified as a Partial Zero Emissions Vehicle (PZEV), managing a 31 mpg/37 mpg fuel economy rating when equipped with the manual. Marginal efficiency for a hybrid.

The inexpensive part was sort of forgotten, too. The CR-Z cost between $19,000 and around $24,000 in 2011, where the CR-X Si topped out at $11,000 in 1991 ($20,146 inflation adjusted).

latest automotive news, best new and used cars, find a new car 7901b_2011_CR_Z_105_EX-1024x683 QOTD: Which Cars Failed to Meet the OEM’s Hype? Honda   And that most important quality, the “sporty?” Well, it wasn’t really there. Media outlets were generally unimpressed with how the CR-Z drove. Car and Driver reported the CR-Z was “…not terribly fun to drive,” and cited the Accord Hybrid’s superior fuel economy and much larger size.

Public opinion matched the car mags, and the CR-Z was short-lived — killed off after the 2016 model year to make room for the upcoming Clarity and Accord Hybrid models.

What’s your pick for a new car which just didn’t live up to the OEM hype?

[Images: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, Honda]

Article source: http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2018/01/qotd-cars-failed-meet-oem-hype/

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