latest automotive news, best new and used cars, find a new car 412dd_subaru_xt6-610x279 Buy/Drive/Burn: Forgotten Japanese Compacts From 1988 Mitsubishi

They’ve got two doors, sporty intentions, and names people forgot long ago. Today we cover three oddball offerings from the latter part of the 1980s.

Will you take home the Nissan, the Mitsubishi, or the Subaru?

(Comments on recent editions of this series tells me some of you need a refresher on the rules.)

The late ’80s was an odd time for Japanese two-door offerings, and many of the designs were square-jawed, early-80s holdouts. While the 1990s and its aero shapes were fast approaching, the new cars weren’t ready just yet. Today we spend some time picking through these forgotten leftovers.

Nissan 200SX

latest automotive news, best new and used cars, find a new car 98d6a_3749153293-e1537838142562-610x410 Buy/Drive/Burn: Forgotten Japanese Compacts From 1988 Mitsubishi   Nissan’s Silvia model took on different identities depending on market, and in North America was badged as the 200SX. Available for the 1984 model year, initial engine offerings included 2.0-liter naturally aspirated and 1.8-liter turbo examples. But that was short lived, as for the 1987 model year the turbo went away and was replaced with an SE trim. Said SE had the 3.0-liter VG30 engine from a naturally aspirated 300ZX. Power was upgraded in 1988 via a five-horsepower boost; 165 horsepower then traveled to the rear via the five-speed manual. Limited in production, only 5,000 of each trim made it to North America for the model’s final two years of 1987 and 1988.

Mitsubishi Cordia

latest automotive news, best new and used cars, find a new car 98d6a_wallpapers_mitsubishi_cordia_1986_1_b Buy/Drive/Burn: Forgotten Japanese Compacts From 1988 Mitsubishi   The Cordia was the Eclipse’s forgotten predecessor. Equipped with engines between 1.4- and 2.0-liters in displacement, the Cordia was front-drive only in North America (other markets had four-wheel drive versions). After Mitsubishi’s new offering arrived in the United States for the 1983 model year, it was promptly reworked for 1984. A facelift brought exterior styling revisions and a newly available 2.0-liter with a turbo attached. That engine (today’s selection) provided 135 horsepower through the five-speed manual. Not inconsiderable in a liftback weighing just about 2,000 pounds. Of special note is the crazy futuristic digital dash option, an early offering for a rather inexpensive car.

Subaru XT6

latest automotive news, best new and used cars, find a new car 98d6a_35003a918aebe5c98011b11fdf6bb698-610x373 Buy/Drive/Burn: Forgotten Japanese Compacts From 1988 Mitsubishi   Rounding out today’s trio is the angular Subaru XT6. Starting out as just “XT” for 1985, the new coupe was a sign of Subaru’s future as the company tried to step away from its 1970s designs (often considered cheap looking or ugly). Consequently, the XT was the first Subaru designed with fun rather than practicality in mind. The original 1.8-liter boxer four was joined for the 1988 model year by the brand new 2.7-liter H6. Subaru injected some added sporting potential into its coupe with the new 145-horsepower engine, which replaced the turbocharged four-cylinder as top trim. Today’s XT6 is front-drive, equipped with a four-speed automatic. Loaded with technology, the aircraft-inspired interior of the XT6 was not replicated on any other car.

Three Japanese options, all of them forgotten. One must burn (and only one). Which will it be?

[Images: Nissan, Mitsubishi, Subaru]

Article source: https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2018/09/buy-drive-burn-forgotten-japanese-compacts-from-1988/

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here